Shrimps are still alive, but algae almost out of control

I was wrong. The shrimp did not die. The day before yesterday I saw all five of them hanging out. Hosanna!

The Ceratophyllum demersum and Egeria densa were dying quicker than they grew. I had to remove them. They are now in a quarantine bucket to see if they can recover at all. I also removed the Java moss. I don’t know if they were dying because of the high temperatures (way over 27 ­°C), allelopathy, or too much light. The temperatures seem to be down to the more acceptable 26 °C now. I also reduced the illumination duration to 10.5 hours plus 4 hours of indirect daylight (what Walstad recommends as a siesta).

The tank currently contains these plant species:

  • Helanthium quadricostatus
  • Hygrophila polysperma
  • Eleocharis acicularis
  • Hemianthus micranthemoides
  • Rotala indica, or maybe rotundifolia
  • Heteranthera zosterifolia, shown below

 

Also I found a some duckweed and other floating plants which I have put in the tank as well. They are doing ok, but are not growing too much. What is growing, however is brown algae and other algae. They are growing so fast that I have to brush them off the leaves every other day and exchange 50% of the water or more.

Tomorrow I’m getting some snails which should help with eating the algae and dead plants.

Egeria Densa Recovering

Last water change seems to have helped Egeria densa (in the title image). The plant is recovering and has two healthy offshoots which are growing rapidly. Other egeria densas are, say, half-healthy. Some of their leaves are rotting away, but the bigger part of them is still green and alive.

Helanthium probably had no brown algae. I could easily wipe it off with my finger. One of the plant guys in the aquarium shop told me that if I can wipe it of with the finger easily, it’s probably just some dirt. The plant looks much cleaner now:

Helanthium quadricostatus (day 12)
Helanthium quadricostatus (day 12)

Ceratophyllum demersum is as happy as ever, growing steadily.

Ceratophyllum demersum (day 12)
Ceratophyllum demersum (day 12)

Hygrophila polysperma is now more than twice the size it was when I planted it. It’s slowly getting into shape to look like one.

Hygrophila polysperma (day 12)
Hygrophila polysperma (day 12)

The Dwarf Hairgrass I have is not an eleocharis pusilla (as I first thought) but an acicularis. The longer kind of it. It’s grown some shoots long shoots. I will leave it grow wildly for couple more weeks before I cut it.

Eleocharis acicularis (day 12)
Eleocharis acicularis (day 12)

Hemianthus micranthemoides is growing higher, but not wider. They say you have to cut it often to make it grow to dense patches. I didn’t want to cut it just yet, but may start doing so later this week.

Hemianthus micranthemoides (day 12)
Hemianthus micranthemoides (day 12)

I did not get a good shot of my rotala indica today, but all of them are growing really well, with many new offshoots. Maybe I’ll show it later this week.

Day 3: Planting

 

Today was planting day. I underestimated the amount of time needed for this, especially when this was the first time planting for me, without any prior experience. Nothing is as easy as it seems. For the lack of time I just put the plants in rather randomly and haphazardly, which I don’t feel much happy about. I wish I had thought it through a bit better. I also found the plant preparing and planting procedure quite strenuous. Hence just a short single-photo post. I’ll try to post more updates this weekend, including a plant list. Let’s hope they all will grow well.

Sleeping and water are lifesavers – that’s true beauty right there. — Sofia Boutella